anticache

Talk: Alvin Sukmadji (November 05, 2018 at 3:00 PM, LNT Library N2405)

05.11.2018

On November 05, 2018 at 3:00 PM, Alvin Sukmadji from University of Toronto will be giving a talk in the LNT Library N2405 about "Error-and-Erasure Staircase Codes".


Error-and-Erasure Staircase Codes

Alvin Sukmadji

University of Toronto

Abstract:

In the past few years, there has been considerable interest in staircase codes, a family of spatially-coupled, algebraic, iteratively-decodable error-correction schemes, that are particularly well suited for application in high-speed optical transport networks. Recent work has shown that staircase codes can profitably be concatenated with a simple soft-decision inner code such as a low-density generator-matrix (LDGM) code or a low-density parity-check (LDPC) code. These concatenated schemes achieve state-of-the-art error-correction performance while maintaining extremely low decoding complexity.

In this project we propose to investigate the use of error-and-erasure decoding in the staircase decoder. Whereas the conventional interface to a noisy channel expected by as staircase code is binary {0,1}-valued, we wish to investigate a ternary {0,1,?}-valued interface. Here the '?' symbol denotes a so-called "erasure," appropriate for symbols where the decoder cannot reliably decide between 0 and 1. It is well-known that error-and-erasure decoding can achieve improved performance with small increase in decoding complexity. We would like to study how a soft-decision decodable code, such as an LDGM or LDPC code, can appropriately declare erasures (for the less reliable bits) in concatenation with an outer staircase code.

Biography:

Alvin received his Bachelor of Applied Science (with High Honours) in Electrical Engineering and Minor in Mathematics from the University of Toronto, Canada in 2017. He is a second-year Master's student under the supervision of Frank Kschischang at the University of Toronto. Alvin is currently visiting Technical University of Munich on August-November 2018 under the Canada Graduate Scholarship - Michael Smith Foreign Study Supplements (CGS-MSFSS) Program. His research interests include coding theory, information theory, and machine learning